This should be illegal, companies should be forced to open-source games (or at least provide the code to people who bought it) if they decide to discontinue it, so people can preserve it on their own.

      • Brawler Yukon
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        465 months ago

        It’s not like it’s never happened to paid full games before.

        *cries in Battleborn*

        • @citrusface@lemmy.world
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          5 months ago

          Don’t you fucking dare say that name. I have never in my life seen a game with so much promise be self fucked so hards by it’s own devs that it kills the game in its tracks.

          NO ONE FUCKING ASKED FOR A BATTLE ROYALE - AND WE SURE AS SHIT DIDNT ASK FOR PAID BATTLE ROYALE SEPARATE FROM THE MAIN GAME.

          …UGH.

          EDIT: I WAS THINKING OF BATTLERITE BUT MY FRUSTRATION IS STILL VERY REAL.

      • @FMT99@lemmy.world
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        55 months ago

        No it’s the great cleansing where… checks notes… billionaires crush the working classes by taking away their free virtual pets?

  • @Seasoned_Greetings@lemmy.world
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    2275 months ago

    This is the natural progression of the games-as-a-service model. Any game that relies on online support of some kind just to function will eventually cease like this.

    Is it stupid that a vr game about a pet relies on online support to function? Absolutely. But it is what it is. Buy more offline games.

    • @OsrsNeedsF2P@lemmy.ml
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      885 months ago

      That’s why for the game I develop, players can request a copy of their save file and we have a singleplayer mode you can download and host yourself.

      It’s not the most convenient thing, but players use it, and it’s future-proof!

    • @BehindTheBarrier@programming.dev
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      285 months ago

      This is also the reason I’m all open source. Not just games, but seeing someone abandon a program hurts. Or just wanting to make a change on your own to suit your needs. I don’t have any big fancy programs, but I at least put my code openly on github.com for that reason. Both my “big” ones are just me using another program and realizing I could make something that worked better for me. At like 100x the time investment, but programming is fun.

      • @Swedneck@discuss.tchncs.de
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        235 months ago

        Looking at the retro computer scene should make anyone a diehard open source fanatic, it’s god awful how much retro stuff relies on a single guy happening to find an old disc in their basement and upload it to the internet, and a lot of the time that never happened and so the software is just lost forever and the only way hardware can be used is by people writing their own software completely from scratch and sharing it with others.

        And of course if they then don’t make it open source that’s extra fun.

        • I Cast Fist
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          25 months ago

          God bless the 8-bit guy and his dream come true, Commander X16.

    • voxel
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      105 months ago

      drg is technically game as a service right? it works fully offline are relies on local save files and steam networking for lobbies

  • recursive_recursion [they/them]
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    1295 months ago

    oh god this reminds me of Japanese man who married Hatsune Miku in hologram form can no longer speak to his wife of four years.

    “The doting husband has gained thousands of followers on Instagram by sharing insights into his life with Miku, but things took an unexpected turn during the pandemic when Gatebox announced it was discontinuing its service for Miku.”

    this is why I have trust issues with proprietary software

      • recursive_recursion [they/them]
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        5 months ago

        hmm not sure if that would work as the model that he was using would be different from what’s available so he’d probably notice some differences which might cause a mix of uncanny valley and surrealism/suspension of disbelief where the two are noticably not the same

        plus using a chat-only model would be real tragic as it’s a significant downgrade from what they already had

        his story actually feels like a Romeo and Juliet situation

        • @Surreal@programming.dev
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          5 months ago

          LLM is capable of role-playing, character.ai for example can get into the role of any character after being trained. The sound is just text-to-speech, character.ai already includes that, though if a realistic voice is desired, it would need to be generated by a more sophisticated method, which is already being done. Example: Neuro-sama, ElevenLabs

        • @brsrklf@jlai.lu
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          15 months ago

          Doesn’t even take a change of service provider to get there.

          Replika had what had very obviously become a virtual mate service too, until they decided “love” wasn’t part of their system anymore. Probably because it looked bad for investors, as happened for a lot of AI-based services people used for smut.

          So a bunch of lonely people had their “virtual companion” suddenly lobotomized, and there’s nothing they could do about it.

            • @brsrklf@jlai.lu
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              25 months ago

              It’s… complicated.

              At first the idea was it’d be training an actual “replica” of yourself, that could reflect your own personality. Then when they realized their was a demand for companionship they converted it into virtual friend. Then of course there was a demand for “more than friends”, and yeah, they made it possible to create a custom mate for a while.

              Then suddenly it became a problem for them to be seen as a light porn generator. Probably because investors don’t want to touch that, or maybe because of a terms of servce change with their AI service provider.

              At that point they started to censor lewd interactions and pretend replika was never supposed to be more than a friendly bot you can talk to. Which is, depending on how you interpret what services they proposed and how they advertized them until then, kind of a blatant lie.

      • I Cast Fist
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        15 months ago

        Next thing you know, he doesn’t read the fine print, ther “brain” is internet connected and, sooner or later, he won’t have a Miku talking back to him again

  • @emax_gomax@lemmy.world
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    1055 months ago

    Game preservation is dying because of DRM. You want games you can still play in 10 years, pirate that sht and donate to those keeping up the good art of game cracking. It’s either that or buying remakes a decade later that are just thinly reskinned. I can live with sht like denuvo since newer games just remove it after a year and then I can buy it. Storefronts like uplay or egs that are dependent on a malignant profit only entity are at best mid-term rentals and at worst spyware you have to pay for the privilege to use.

    • twoface
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      35 months ago

      Furthermore, if you don’t want to pirate: Buy your games on GoG. They are DRM free and you don’t need the launcher to play (GoG Galaxy is amazing though btw)

  • @sparr@lemmy.world
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    625 months ago

    My proposal is for a mandated label on software and hardware to indicate that it will stop working when some online service goes offline.

    • @Darkenfolk@dormi.zone
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      325 months ago

      And then what? Corporations will just slap a disclaimer on their products informing you of said condition and that you need to agree, understand and accept these terms and conditions and call it a day.

      • @UFO64@lemmy.world
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        205 months ago

        Aye, but forcing them to put a clear “We support this until this date” label will make that a mandated part of their marketed.

        That or, you know, force companies to release server software when they sunset support for their product. That would also be nice.

      • @sparr@lemmy.world
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        15 months ago

        And then products without that label would gain at least a little a bit of market share. Most people still buy inefficient fridges because they are shinier, but at least a few read those yellow labels mandated by law and choose the more efficient ones.

    • @Flax_vert@feddit.uk
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      05 months ago

      Ironically Nintendo sort of did that on physical boxes for their consoles that was actually just a download key in a cartridge

  • JokeDeity
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    565 months ago

    I’ve had that thought many times. I wish companies would release the source of games they discontinue instead of letting them completely die out.

    • @ipkpjersi@lemmy.ml
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      355 months ago

      That’s the horrible thing about online services. You never really own it, it can be taken away from you at any time. If you want to preserve something, you need physical and/or offline access.

      • @doctorcrimson@lemmy.today
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        -85 months ago

        And in addition to that sentiment, compression from moving or sending a copy of a copy is known to very slowly degrade digital media, so physical is almost always preferred.

          • @Naz@sh.itjust.works
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            25 months ago

            I have a folder on my D: called OLDINSTALL.

            It’s my entire hard drive from 1996, including DOS.

            I think it’s a couple hundred megabytes in size, but the vast majority of the files and games were exclusively in floppy disk format.

            I don’t have a floppy drive or any disks anymore.

          • @doctorcrimson@lemmy.today
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            5 months ago

            Sure, it’s possible, but it’s unlikely. A properly kept laserdisc compared to, for example, a YouTube Video isn’t even a competition. Physical media not exposed to radiation or impact can last decades if not centuries. Don’t even get me started on Vynil.

                • @millie@lemmy.film
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                  35 months ago

                  Literally every seeder is part of that archive. You can look at individual trackers in the microcosm as individual archives and indices, but it’s the culture of piracy that causes the wide scale collection and preservation of media.

                  We’re actually at this kind of interesting cross-generational point of guerilla archival where it’s become easier to find certain obscure pieces of media history. I suspect this is in large part due to things like bounties, where suddenly a forgotten VHS of a 35 year old HBO special that aired once or twice could be a step toward a higher rank and greater access to a wider range of media.

                  Modern piracy has a strong incentive toward finding lost material that’s no longer readily available. Zero day content is great, but have you seen the RADAR pilot or both seasons of AfterMASH?

                  They belong in a museum. Indie would be proud, even if Harrison wouldn’t. Not that I know his perspective on piracy.

        • @lightnegative@lemmy.world
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          5 months ago

          Err, no. Lossless compression is lossless and there are a bunch of techniques to ensure that a copy is bit-for-bit identical to the original

        • @Honytawk@lemmy.zip
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          75 months ago

          It is literally the other way around.

          There is no way for digital media to degrade, unless it is the physical media.

          • @doctorcrimson@lemmy.today
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            -65 months ago

            Compression and transmission of data causes loss of parity. We lose or flip some 1s and 0s. Over time the effects become very noticeable. The best visual example I can think of are experiments where YouTubers downloaded and reuploaded their own video 100 times, it very quickly degrades. In a more reasonable scenario, near lossless file types and compressions would degrade much more slowly.

            • @chicken@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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              85 months ago

              experiments where YouTubers downloaded and reuploaded their own video 100 times, it very quickly degrades

              That just means Youtube’s software uses lossy compression, that is a Youtube problem, not a digital media problem. Are you familiar with the concept of file hashing? A short string can be derived from a file, such that if any bit of the file is altered, it will produce a different hash. This can be used in combination with other methods to ensure perfect data consistency; for example a file torrent that remains well seeded won’t degrade, because the hash is checked by the software, so if anyone’s copy changes at all due to physical degradation of a harddrive or whatever other reason, the error will be recognized and routed around. If you don’t want to rely on other people to preserve something, there is always RAID, a 50 year old technology that also avoids data changing or being lost assuming that you maintain your hardware and replace disks as they break.

              Here’s the fundamental reason you’re wrong about this: computers are capable of accounting for every bit, conclusively determining if even one of them has changed, and restoring from redundant backup. If someone wants to perfectly preserve a digital file and has the necessary resources and knowledge, they can easily do so. No offense but what you are saying is ignorant of a basic property of how computers work and what they are capable of.

              • @doctorcrimson@lemmy.today
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                05 months ago

                It’s the most obvious example of a digital media problem. Computers might be able to account for every bit with the use of parity files and backups with frequent parity checks, but the fact is most people aren’t running a server with 4 separately powered and monitored drives as their home computer, and even the most complex system of data storage can fail or degrade eventually.

                We live in a world of problems, like the YouTube problem, compression problems, encoding problems, etc. We do because we chose efficiency and ease of use over permanency.

                • @chicken@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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                  15 months ago

                  Computers might be able to account for every bit with the use of parity files and backups with frequent parity checks

                  Yes, and this can be done through mostly automatic or distributed processes.

                  even the most complex system of data storage can fail or degrade eventually.

                  I wouldn’t describe it as complex, just the bare minimum of what is required to actually preserve data with no loss. All physical mediums may degrade through physical processes, but redundant systems can do better.

                  but the fact is most people aren’t running a server with 4 separately powered and monitored drives as their home computer

                  It isn’t hard to seed a torrent. If a group of people want to preserve a file, they can do it this way, perfectly, forever, so long as there remain people willing to devote space and bandwidth.

                  We live in a world of problems, like the YouTube problem, compression problems, encoding problems, etc. We do because we chose efficiency and ease of use over permanency.

                  All of these problems boil down to intent. Do people intend to preserve a file, do they not care, do they actively favor degradation? In the case of the OP game, it seems that the latter must be the case. Same with Youtube, same with all those media companies removing shows and movies entirely from all public availability, same with a lot of companies. If someone wants to preserve something, they choose the correct algorithms, simple as that. There isn’t necessarily much of a tradeoff for efficiency and ease of use in doing so, disk space is cheap, bandwidth is cheap, the technology is mature and not complicated to use. Long term physical storage can be a part of that, but it isn’t a replacement for intent or process.

            • @CeeBee@lemmy.world
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              65 months ago

              The best visual example I can think of are experiments where YouTubers downloaded and reuploaded their own video 100 times

              This has nothing to do with copying a file. YouTube re-encodes videos whenever they are uploaded.

              A file DOES NOT DEGRADE when it is copied. That is something that happened to VHS and cassette tapes. It does not happen to digital files. You can even verify this by generating a hash of a file, copy it 10,000 times, and generate a new hash and they would be 100% identical.

                • @CeeBee@lemmy.world
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                  5 months ago

                  No I won’t be, because I’ve done this before for various reasons, but not a single but was changed.

                  Let me put it this way. A computer stores programs and instructions it needs to run in files on a drive. These files contain exact and precise instructions for various components to operate. If even a SINGLE bit is off in just a couple of the OS files, your computer will start throwing constant errors if not just crashing entirely.

                  And this isn’t just theory. It’s provable. Cosmic rays have been known to sometimes hit a drive and cause a bit-flip. Or another issue is a drive not being powered on for a long time causing bit-rot

                  At this point I’m starting to think you’re a troll. There’s no way someone believes what you’re saying.

                  Edit: autocorrect

            • @pikmeir@lemmy.world
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              45 months ago

              You’re referring to a video codec degrading as it keeps rendering the video again, not just copying and pasting the bits. There is no degradation from copying and pasting a file as-is.

              • @doctorcrimson@lemmy.today
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                -55 months ago

                No, I am not referring to that. YouTubers have the option to download their own videos. Not steal it with a video downloading tool.

          • JackbyDev
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            35 months ago

            Also even if you’re using lossy compression you don’t recompress things every time lol.

          • @doctorcrimson@lemmy.today
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            -35 months ago

            If you use most digital formats for media and compress them with something like .7z or Winrar, then it might take years or decades to noticeable degrade, but it is still a matter of when not if.

            • @CeeBee@lemmy.world
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              05 months ago

              Holy crap. File compression is not the same thing as lossy media compression.

              File compression uses mathematical algorithms to create definable outcomes. Meaning it doesn’t matter how much you compress/uncompress a file, it will always be exactly the same.

              5 X 2 will always give you 10 and 10 ÷ 2 will always give you 5.

    • @Viking_Hippie@lemmy.world
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      15 months ago

      I believe the founder and first queen of Carthage said that if we don’t learn to circumvent that, we deserve nothing more than we get. She went on to claim that nothing we have is truly ours.

      Is it just me or was that Phoenician quite a bit ahead of her time?

  • @dx1@lemmy.world
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    5 months ago

    Archival is extremely important and one of the side effects of copyright schemes is that they limit its viability. The less access people have, the more likely some work becomes lost forever. I’ve seen it a few times already, with recent work, but in one or two hundred years we’re talking about libraries of art that could have been preserved but are just gone.

    Closed source software, that’s actually distributed to people, has all kinds of problems beyond that too. Tons has been written about that, but from an artistic perspective, I think the biggest loss is that people can’t legally expand the original work. Giant franchises with a central cultural presence get walled off and usually just go through a huge creative decline, which is crazy because there’s millions of people preoccupied with the concepts from the franchise who are barred from using them to express themselves. With software in specific, if it’s open source you can modify it, fix it, expand it, maintain it, whatever - there’s all these great resources they could use, but we won’t let them.

    • Beefalo
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      75 months ago

      It’s pretty insane. At first I thought damn, from now on our culture will be so thoroughly documented that future historians will struggle to parse it all, but now I can’t trust anything to last for 5 years and I can’t have copies of it, either.

      Piracy shmiracy, some random dude’s homegrown server is not an archive, and anything that fails without electricity to power it is not a copy.

  • @Flax_vert@feddit.uk
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    435 months ago

    I bought a bunch of music on Google Play Music, forgot about it. Come back a year later and it’s all deleted because they shut the service down.

    • 𝒍𝒆𝒎𝒂𝒏𝒏
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      35 months ago

      Wouldn’t be surprised.

      Partner found out about the unity crap when a bunch of steam library games published updates about changes in development, at least one of which stated they’re transitioning from free to paid

  • I Cast Fist
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    235 months ago

    Can any owner of this game tell me whether it is online only or not? Or what uses it has for an internet connection? Because back in mah dayTM© that’d be the kind of thing you’d download once and, even if the online service died, you’d still have a working program/game afterwards.